Significant Correction of a Miscalculation by Dr. William Riker?

From my dissertation: Following Riker (1955), Resolutions of Instruction (ROI) were ineffective compared to the recall provision of the Articles of Confederation, and the circumstances surrounding ROI did not affect the partisan legislature after Ratification. At this, Grynaviski finds that a state’s decision to pass a ROI with respect for President Jackson’s Bank War, “was closely related to whether it issued bonds to…

New York, Leading Long Before California?

From my dissertation: Ray Gunn (1980) wrote ”The New York State Legislature: A Developmental Perspective: 1777-1846,” published in Social Science History, because he was stumped that “Given the centrality of legislatures in our representative system government, it is a remarkable fact that there is today no general, systematic history of state legislative development in America” (p. 267). By the time of the Constitution, republicanism had matriculated…

James Madison’s Training Manual for President Trump re: Aliens and Sedition.

From my dissertation: A vexing aspect of the controversy over the Alien and Sedition laws is noticeable in the prominent role that James Madison played in drafting the Virginia Resolves. Little more than a decade before, he had supported giving the national government the power to veto state laws and to ignore ROI when the Tucker Amendment sought to include the right of Instruction in the Constitution, yet Madison now appears to…

Evidence of republicanism During 21st Century?

From my dissertation: Where do we begin to study republicanism during the early 21st century? Given the nature of republicanism seemingly everywhere before the Civil War, I took a chance to research whether Resolutions of Instruction were passed against the Patriot Act of 2001 because it appeared to mimic the Alien and Sedition laws. The…

Why don’t Political Scientists study “republicanism” as much as “liberalism” during early 21st Century?

from my dissertation William Riker, a political scientist, in the much-admired Journal of the American Political Science Review, supports Eaton (1952) insofar as Instruction was moot after 1860 (1955). At the time of the Founding, the Constitution established two types of federalism. In the former, national supremacy is a closed question, and this is called “centrally-directed or centralized” (p. 453). The latter path of constitutional effectuality showcases that ”decisions are made, partially at least, through the machinery…

Dear Political Scientists, Let’s Study republicanism.

From my dissertation: Keeping Instruction from the Constitution was a point of departure regarding the republican tradition under the Articles of Confederation with respect for the implementation of self-government; meanwhile, the practice of Instruction grew after Ratification and, according to the evidence, is partly responsible for the need to develop the Committee System. The states…