“Right to Instruct is COMMON American Experience” #mpsanet

Last year, I presented a paper at the Midwest Political Science Association regarding the “Right to Instruct” as an informal and formal American institution during the antebellum era. Informally, republican core values governed the hearts of the salient Founders. Formally, we witness “how” the Founders formally institutionalized republicanism during the antebellum era (paper here). There are…

# Z: Right to Instruct [Volk]

NOTES: Kyle G. Volk. The Perils of “Pure Democracy”: Minority Rights, Liquor Politics, and Popular Sovereignty in Antebellum America. Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 29, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 641-679 Quotes: “With local option, reformers and supportive legislators implicitly weighed in on two broad and interrelated questions that had been confronting the Anglo–American…

# 10. “Right to Instruct” [Eaton]

NOTES ON “RIGHT TO INSTRUCT” Author: Eaton, Clement. Southern Senators and the Right of Instruction, 1789-1860. The Journal of Southern History, Vol. 18, No. 3 (Aug., 1952), pp. 303-319. The Point: In theory, the point of Resolutions of Instruction is to enable republican democracy—the will of the people to instruct their representatives. In practice, Resolutions…