Senate “Talk” in 1778!

I’ve been reading a lot about the Senate lately. I find reading about the Senate in 1778 to be so different…

The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States, Volume 2 Congress.–Franklin’s Commission and Instructions.

October 21, 1778.

The committee appointed to prepare a letter of credence notifying to his most Christian majesty the appointment of Benjamin Franklin, esq., to be the minister plenipotentiary of these States at the court of France, and also the draught of instructions to the said minister, brought in the draught of a letter which was agreed to.

“To our great, faithful, and beloved friend and ally Louis the Sixteenth, King of France anal Navarre.

“Great, faithful, and beloved friend and ally: The principles of equality and reciprocity on which you have entered into treaties with us give you an additional security for that good faith with which we shall observe them from motives of honor and of affection to your majesty. The distinguished part you have taken in the support of the liberties and independence of these States can not but inspire them with the most ardent wishes for the interest and the glory of France.

“We have nominated Benjamin Franklin, esq., to reside at your court in quality of our minister plenipotentiary, that he may give you more particular assurances of the grateful sentiments which you have excited in us and in each of the United States. We beseech you to give entire credit to everything which he shall deliver on our part, more especially when he shall assure you of the permanency of our friendship; and we pray God that he will keep your majesty, our great, faithful, and beloved friend and ally, in his most holy protection.

Done at Philada. the — day of October, 1778, by the Congress of North America, your good friends and allies.

Signed H. L., President.

Attest, C. T., Secretary.

I don’t even know where to begin… to comment.

 

 

 

 

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